Last updated: Wed-29 Sep 2021

Free of Charge! AOGS Live in Singapore Hybrid Event

All virtual attendees can converse and join discussions live with
panellists and onsite attendees Sign Up Here


Panels: Climate Change (UN IPCC AR6) | Exploration and Science | Geoscience Education: Future Opportunities

13 & 14 Oct 2021 at the Hybrid Broadcast Studio, Marina Bay Sands Singapore

The world has changed in the past decade and drastically in the past year. In response to those changes, AOGS is very excited to host three panel discussions addressing current issues. During the last decade, a growing portion of the public has become aware of the need for sustainability and the UN has developed a set of 17 goals for sustainable development.

Our first expert panel discusses the impact and consequences of climate change for the environment and our lives. It focuses more on the climate change itself from the scientific aspects (the mechanism of climate change as revealed by numerical simulations, etc.). The panel will be reviewing the contents of UN IPCC AR6.

Our second panel examines the distinct relationship between exploration and science. This panel discusses examples of how scientists adjust themselves in large-scale exploration missions to maximize the scientific outcomes and; human and robotic partnership for exploration. How we, particularly young researchers, should prepare for the future.

Our third panel addresses the many impacts that the UN sustainable goals has had on our geoscience research, teaching, learning, and careers. Our expert panelists are diverse in career level, discipline, country, and gender. The experts will all give a short presentation to illuminate their expertise. A chaired, open discussion on the topics will follow the short introductions.

This event is fully supported by the Singapore Tourism Board and Office for Space Technology and Industry (OSTIn) – Economic Development Board and will be made accessible to anyone interested, free of charge. Planned schedule is as shown and you will be notified of any changes. Please see also below for panel descriptions, members of the panels and the moderators.

Wed-13 Oct 2021 16:00 – 17:30 Panel: Climate Change (UN IPCC A6R)
Thu-14 Oct 2021 09:30 – 10:30 Panel: Exploration and Science
16:00 – 17:30 Panel: Geoscience Education – Future Opportunities

Important Notes:

  1. Program Uses Singapore Standard Time and is 8 hours ahead of GMT (GMT+08:00)
  2. In-person participation is by invitation only with strict attendee limits. Only fully vaccinated individuals will be admitted and mask-wearing is compulsory.
  3. All virtual attendees can converse and join discussions live with panellists and onsite attendees.

Date: Wed-13 Oct 2021   |   Time: 16:00 – 17:30
Panel: Climate Change (UN IPCC AR6)
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8-min Presentation, Followed by 25-min Q&A

The sixth assessment Report (AR6) of the UN IPCC (Inter-governmental Panel on Climate Change) was published, immediately after our annual meeting, AOGS2021 virtual. During the 8 years since the previous assessment report (AR5) was published, atmospheric CO2 and sea levels have continued to rise and numerous disastrous weather events caused significant damages and fatalities worldwide. Backed by scientific evidence, the AR6 points out that resource-intensive human activities are the likely cause of the recent acceleration of climate change. At AOGS2021 virtual, a panel discussion dealt with UN sustainable development goals (SDGs). Among a set of 17 SDGs, to assist us to switch from a resource intensive economic system to a sustainable economic system, #13 directly mentions the climate change, #7 mentions the use of clean and recoverable energy, #14 and #15 mention conservation of resources in oceans and forests. However, this panel focuses more on the climate change itself from the scientific aspects (the mechanism of climate change as revealed by numerical simulations, etc.) by reviewing the contents of UN IPCC AR6.

Topics and Panellists

[1] Prof. Peter THORNE, Professor in Physical Geography, Maynooth University
Lead Author, Chap. 2, IPCC AR6: Changing State of the Climate System

[2] Dr. Krishnan RAGHAVAN, Scientist-G and Executive Director, Centre for Climate Change Research, Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology
Lead Author, Chap. 8, IPCC AR6: Water Cycle Changes

[3] Dr. Tieh-Yong KOH, Associate Professor, Singapore University of Social Sciences
Atmospheric Dynamics Aspects of Climate Changes

[4] Prof. Martin VISBECK, Head of the Research Unit of Physical Oceanography, GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel and Kiel University
Clivar and Ocean Related Climate Change and the UN Decade for Ocean Sustainable Development

[5] Prof. Francisco DOBLAS-REYES, Director, Earth Science Department, Barcelona Supercomputing Center
Lead Author, Chap. 10, IPCC AR6: Linking Global to Regional Climate Change

[6] Prof. Benjamin HORTON, Director, Earth Observatory of Singapore, Professor, Asian School of the Environment, Nanyang Technological University
Review Editor, Chap. 9, IPCC AR6: Ocean, Cryosphere and Sea Level Change
Sea Level Rise and the Impact for Asia

[7] Prof. Josep CANADELL, Chief Research Scientist, Climate Science Center, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Organization (CSIRO)
Lead Author, Chap. 5, IPCC AR6: Global Carbon and other Biogeochemical Cycles and Feedbacks

[8] Dr. June-Yi LEE, Associate Professor, Research Center for Climate Sciences, Pusan National University
Lead Author, Chap. 4, IPCC AR6: Future Global Climate: Scenario-based Projections and Near-term Information

Moderator: Dr Lauriane CHARDOT, Earth Science Specialist, Earth Observatory of Singapore, Nanyang Technological University

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8-min Presentation, Followed by 25-min Q&A

Exploring “unknown” worlds (extremities on the earth or the space) is sometimes driven by “science”, but more often by other interests (exploring resources, expanding fields of human activities, etc.). In the past, explorations were often conducted by small groups of people who united under a single purpose. Modern explorations, on the other hand, tend to be much larger in scale and much more expensive in both time and money, hence favoring multi-purposed projects (“science” would be just a part) and involving as many different kinds of players as possible. Under such circumstances, scientists are required to be broader based, flexible and adjustable in carrying out studies based on their interests. This panel discusses examples of how scientists adjust themselves in large-scale exploration missions to maximize the scientific outcomes. How we, particularly young researchers, should prepare for the future.

Topics and Panellists

[1] Lunar Exploration (Science of the Moon, Astronomical Observatory on the Moon)
Prof. Ikkoh FUNAKI, Deputy Director of International Strategy and Coordination, Institute of Space and Aeronautical Science Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Japan (Space Exploration Innovation Hub Center, Open Innovation for Science and Robotic/Manned Exploration)

[2] Asteroid Exploration (Science and Resource Exploration)
Prof. Hideaki MIYAMOTO, Professor, The University of Tokyo, Asteroids + Space Resources

[3] Deep Ocean Exploration
Prof Zhiyu LIU, Associate Dean, College of Ocean and Earth Sciences, Xiamen University

[4] Legal Aspects
Prof Michelle HANLON, Co-Director, Centre for Air and Space Law, The University of Mississippi, Co-Founder and President, For All Moonkind

[5] Remote Sensing
Prof Sang-Ho YUN, Associate Professor and Director, Remote Sensing Lab, Earth Observatory of Singapore, Nanyang Technological University

[6] Remote Imaging, Sensing and Processing
Dr Santo V. SALINAS CORTIJO, Senior Research Scientist, Centre for Remote Imaging, Sensing and Processing (CRISP), National University of Singapore

Moderator: Mr. Chris LECK, Deputy Executive Director, Office for Space Technology and Industry (OSTIn)

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8-min Presentation, Followed by 25-min Q&A

The geosciences are essential to achieving the UN Sustainable development goals, for developing of improved environmental insight for future generations, and for maintaining an Earth capable of supporting human civilization. Thus, there is a strong need for good geoscience education. Geoscience education has long been established on a solid theoretical foundation, based in the basic sciences and practical experience gained from both the laboratory and the field. However at pre-University levels, the Geosciences still suffer from a low profile and priority in schools worldwide and do not inspire enough students to pursue geoscience. Geoscience education must address both this low profile issue and adapt to the post covid, data rich society of the future, in order to prepare the next generation using new and novel ways. Here, we will address our vision of what the future directions in the field geoscience education ought to be.

The key questions are:

  • How can we overcome the disturbing gap between the educational potential of the Geosciences and its low profile in schools?
  • What are the characteristics of a good geoscience student in the modern age?
  • How has Geoscience education changed in recent times?
  • What impacts did Covid 19 have on the future of Geoscience education?
  • What comprises good online content and how can we improve the online content in the geosciences?
  • What impact will AI, big data, satellite based platforms and technologies and online material have on future Geoscience programs?

Panellists:

  • Prof. Benoit TAISNE, Associate Professor, Asian School of the Environment, Principal Investigator, Earth Observatory of Singapore - Nanyang Technological University
  • Prof. Iain STEWART, El Hassan bin Talal Research Chair in Sustainability, Royal Scientific Society
  • Ms. Lynette TAN, Chief Executive, Singapore Space & Technology Ltd
  • Dr. Wei Lin TAN, Senior Manager (Technology), Office for Space Technology & Industry (OSTIn)

Moderator: Prof. Adam SWITZER, Associate Professor, Asian School of the Environment, Assistant Dean (Development), College of Science, Director, Undergraduate Research Experience on Campus (URRECA) Program, Principal Investigator, Earth Observatory of Singapore - Nanyang Technological University